A Blog Celebrating The Women History Forgot

"Well-Behaved Women Rarely Make History."
These women misbehaved, but where are they in our history books?
wrestleforgold:

greenteaandgreatworkouts:

descroissants:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston marathon. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire marathon.The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines, and Kathrine later won the NYC marathon with a time of 3:07:29. [Wiki]
Awesome women in history.

wrestleforgold:

greenteaandgreatworkouts:

descroissants:

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to run the Boston marathon. After realizing that a woman was running, race organizer Jock Semple went after Switzer shouting, “Get the hell out of my race and give me those numbers.” However, Switzer’s boyfriend and other male runners provided a protective shield during the entire marathon.The photographs taken of the incident made world headlines, and Kathrine later won the NYC marathon with a time of 3:07:29. [Wiki]

Awesome women in history.

(Source: sabino, via subtlesettledrage)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Kaʻiulani, the last crown princess of Hawai’i.
Kaʻiulani was a teenage student in England when the Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown.  She traveled to the US in hopes of preventing the annexation of Hawai’i.  Elegant, multilingual, and  well-spoken, Kaʻiulani impressed journalists and President Grover Cleveland but she was not able to restore the monarchy.  The situation stalled  with the monarchy out of power but no formal US annexation.  After four more years in Europe, Kaʻiulani returned to Hawaii as a private citizen and witnessed the 1898 annexation of her country.  She died less than a year later at the age of 23.   

coolchicksfromhistory:

Kaʻiulani, the last crown princess of Hawai’i.

Kaʻiulani was a teenage student in England when the Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown.  She traveled to the US in hopes of preventing the annexation of Hawai’i.  Elegant, multilingual, and  well-spoken, Kaʻiulani impressed journalists and President Grover Cleveland but she was not able to restore the monarchy.  The situation stalled  with the monarchy out of power but no formal US annexation.  After four more years in Europe, Kaʻiulani returned to Hawaii as a private citizen and witnessed the 1898 annexation of her country.  She died less than a year later at the age of 23.   

(via subtlesettledrage)

goldalinne:

afrodiaspores:

Black, Chicana, and First Nations radical socialist and anarchist labor organizer Lucy E. [González or Gonzales] Parsons (1853-1942) ca. 1920.

“Feared by the authorities because of her charismatic fiery speeches and intellect, the first Afro-Latina woman of color to engage prominently in the history of the Leftist American labor movement was labeled as ‘more dangerous than a thousand rioters’ by the Chicago Police Department.”

William Loren Katz writes in a passage adapted from Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage,

A dynamic, militant, self-educated public speaker and writer, she became the first American woman of color to carry her crusade for socialism across the country and overseas. Lucy Gonzales started life in Texas. She was of Mexican American, African American, and Native American descent and born into slavery. The path she chose after emancipation led to conflict with the Ku Klux Klan, hard work, painful personal losses, and many nights in jail. In Albert Parsons, a white man whose Waco Spectator fought the Klan and demanded social and political equality for African Americans, she found a handsome, committed soul mate. The white supremacy forces in Texas considered the couple dangerous and their marriage illegal, and soon drove them from the state…
She was one of only two women delegates (the other was Mother Jones) among the 200 men at the founding convention of the militant Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) and the only woman to speak…
Lucy Parsons’ determined effort to elevate and inspire the oppressed to take command remained alive among those who knew, heard, and loved her. But few today are aware of her insights, courage, and tenacity. Despite her fertile mind, writing and oratorical skills, and striking beauty, Lucy Parsons has not found a place in school texts, social studies curricula, or Hollywood movies.

goldalinne:

afrodiaspores:

Black, Chicana, and First Nations radical socialist and anarchist labor organizer Lucy E. [González or Gonzales] Parsons (1853-1942) ca. 1920.

Feared by the authorities because of her charismatic fiery speeches and intellect, the first Afro-Latina woman of color to engage prominently in the history of the Leftist American labor movement was labeled as ‘more dangerous than a thousand rioters’ by the Chicago Police Department.”

William Loren Katz writes in a passage adapted from Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage,

A dynamic, militant, self-educated public speaker and writer, she became the first American woman of color to carry her crusade for socialism across the country and overseas. Lucy Gonzales started life in Texas. She was of Mexican American, African American, and Native American descent and born into slavery. The path she chose after emancipation led to conflict with the Ku Klux Klan, hard work, painful personal losses, and many nights in jail. In Albert Parsons, a white man whose Waco Spectator fought the Klan and demanded social and political equality for African Americans, she found a handsome, committed soul mate. The white supremacy forces in Texas considered the couple dangerous and their marriage illegal, and soon drove them from the state…

She was one of only two women delegates (the other was Mother Jones) among the 200 men at the founding convention of the militant Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) and the only woman to speak…

Lucy Parsons’ determined effort to elevate and inspire the oppressed to take command remained alive among those who knew, heard, and loved her. But few today are aware of her insights, courage, and tenacity. Despite her fertile mind, writing and oratorical skills, and striking beauty, Lucy Parsons has not found a place in school texts, social studies curricula, or Hollywood movies.

(via goldalinne-deactivated20130812)

To find out more about this fascinating woman check out these links!
(Thank you sadpubes for suggesting her to me!)

To find out more about this fascinating woman check out these links!

(Thank you sadpubes for suggesting her to me!)

(Source: historicalheroines)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Plant physiologist Helen Kemp Archbold Porter, the first woman to head a department at the Imperial College of Science and Technology.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Plant physiologist Helen Kemp Archbold Porter, the first woman to head a department at the Imperial College of Science and Technology.

Thank you so much for this information. Sadly I have a limited amount of time for research, and little space to write in, and so some of my wording or information may be lacking. So I really appreciate you letting me know about this!

Thank you so much for this information. Sadly I have a limited amount of time for research, and little space to write in, and so some of my wording or information may be lacking. So I really appreciate you letting me know about this!

jedees:

I LOVE your blog! I’m working on a similar project, called "Fearsome Ladies in History" where I illustrate an awesome lady in history and add a very brief description of why she’s fearsome (usually quoted from wikipedia, I’m a bit lazy when it comes to the extensive research)

Keep up the great blog!!

Thank you so much! Your blog is amazing! If anyone is interested in other awesome ladies and adorable illustrations, check it out!

coolchicksfromhistory:

Harvard Observatory astronomer Muriel E. Mussells Seyfert after she discovered three new ring nebulae in the Milky Way, March 1936.
Muriel was also a painter, two of her portraits can be see at Vanderbilt University’s Dyer Observatory (1, 2).

coolchicksfromhistory:

Harvard Observatory astronomer Muriel E. Mussells Seyfert after she discovered three new ring nebulae in the Milky Way, March 1936.

Muriel was also a painter, two of her portraits can be see at Vanderbilt University’s Dyer Observatory (1, 2).

(via subtlesettledrage)

Sheppard began her activism by focusing on the restrictive rules regarding women’s dress (particularly the abolishment of the corset and other confining clothing) and promoted bicycling and other physical activities for women. And she did not end her activism after New Zealand gave women the right to vote, as she fought for women’s suffrage in other countries like England and the United States. Her image is currently on New Zealand’s $10 banknote.
To learn more, visit these pages! (And thank you to mrsbutlertron for suggesting Sheppard to me!)

Sheppard began her activism by focusing on the restrictive rules regarding women’s dress (particularly the abolishment of the corset and other confining clothing) and promoted bicycling and other physical activities for women. And she did not end her activism after New Zealand gave women the right to vote, as she fought for women’s suffrage in other countries like England and the United States. Her image is currently on New Zealand’s $10 banknote.

To learn more, visit these pages! (And thank you to mrsbutlertron for suggesting Sheppard to me!)

(Source: historicalheroines)